Category Archives: Railroad

One more adventure with an old friend – Part 2 – Fill your boots

Hard to believe what has happened over the last 9 months. Just myself and this incredible horse of mine on an adventure that I had dreamt of for as long as I can remember. If this is what it feels like to realise a dream, get out there. It will have you dancing alone atop a mountain, breaking down in tears of hardship and joy, realising your capabilities, after all, what is a life in which you don’t know of what you are truly capable.

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Red, not sure where to start with this incredible horse, he has achieved a feat that only a handful of horses in the world can boast, and solo. A true legend in the horse world. Having covered over 6000kms taking us from Northern Colombia, through Ecuador and on to the border of Peru. Overcoming several injuries, traversing the Andes, passing through a section of the Amazon and he is still petrified of sheep! the difference in his character and condition incredible, below you can see the difference in him from day 1 and to now.

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It is hard to explain the connection you build, a bond so strong that you don’t think twice to run in front of a charging bull to protect, will spend your last dollar on vets bills, sleep curled close to one another for warmth when at 3600m up in the mountains. Saying goodbye was never going to be possible.

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Finding a deserving resting spot for Red has been a high priority for a long time which is why I was so happy to have happened upon EL Picadero. How I found this place is a story in itself that I will come back to. But here in a small village, I found the perfect spot for my friend …… I say resting spot as there will be another chapter. El Picadero is a beautiful riding school near Latacunga back towards the North of Ecuador. Run by an incredible Swiss/Ecuadorian family where I could be sure Red would receive the best quality of care.

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Having reached the limit of Ecuador and knowing the difficulties of passing borders on horseback this was where this chapter together was to end. Not wanting to risk being unable to return him to Ecuador and El Picadero we loaded up. Red is not accustomed to being transported and so I travelled the several hours in the back of the truck with him, seeing the hundreds of miles we had passed together over weeks and weeks disappear in moments. Realising again just how fortunate I have been to travel the way I did. The doors it opened and the lessons I have learnt will change me for ever. For the better or worse I will wait to see. And so, frozen faced we arrived back into the Cotopaxi region of Ecuador, not without one last finale.

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Volcan Cotopaxi – which I rode over just 7 weeks prior, having been dormant for over 140 years suddenly woke, throwing ash hundreds of miles, dispersing and rendering homeless thousands of people who live in the area that would be affected were it to fully errupt. Not being newsworthy like the rantings of a buffoon running for election is hard to find out any information but I gather the activity is heightening and my thoughts are with those affected.

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The farm where Red is now is in a safe zone, the picture below is from 5 minutes after we arrived and he was back with herd. Welcomed to whinies from the other horses I can feel happy that thanks to your help in paying for the transport he is in a good place, for this I cannot thank you all enough. What was used to transport him back I will match and put into the pot of funds raised for the charities involved now that I will be returning to work.

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I am truly humbled by your support throughout this journey, hard to find words that convey just how much it has meant. The donations, the kind messages that keep you going, the friends and family out there, and people who I have never met thank you, thank you so very much. This is where Red and I take a break, Red to rest, for me back to world. 9 months, 6000kms, 3 countries, 1 incredible horse. Having trouble processing right now to be honest. leaving my horse behind is one of the most heart wrenching moments of my life, I still well up looking at a photo, or even just having a passing thought and am not ashamed to say so.

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I have lined up a few events and fundraisers, with a chance to see previously unseen footage recorded throughout this trip and a few other surprises. The final event taking place mid December after which all funds raised for the charities with whom I volunteered throughout this trip will be sent out – just in time for Christmas. Details to follow but now looking forward to spending some time with the family, being an Uncle to my awesome Niece and Nephew and eating …….. and eating!

Thank you for reading and as I was once told – Fill your boots, below are a just a few of my favorite photos from this journey. Thank you for being with us throughout.

Marc

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One more adventure with an old friend – Part 1

The last few weeks have been some of the most challenging, interesting and emotional but most of all given me one of my happiest and clearest experiences of my life.

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Pushing South toward the border of Ecuador Red seems to be in the best condition of his life. Riding open plains, with my bag lighter than ever (and myself 6 belt holes and 18lbs lighter since day 1) we are covering more ground than before and loving every moment. Getting the chance to canter through open paramour is something you dream of, this ridiculous image you conjure up before departing like the idea that you will at the end of a day in the saddle swim in a lake, read a book, catch a fish, but it actually happened. I got the chance to realise a dream, that will do something to a man.IMG_0847[1]

Pushing on through the paramour, area inhabited by the Quichua. I got to see some of the best of Ecuador. Passing mountains, ravines and rivers, riding through small villages and picking up supplies and advice from friendly locals. We all know the saying “you don’t know what you’ve got until its gone” But I was fortunate enough, thanks to my companion Red, to realise what I had a long time ago, making this experience all the richer. Stopping to pick up feed for Red usually turns into a 2hr episode, a million questions and my horse continuing his bid to become the most photographed horse in South America. I used to be ancy, wanting to push on but lately make the most of the opportunity, making new friends and swapping tales. (and looking over maps with some future adventurers)

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Of the last few weeks on the trail I spent some nights in some pretty nasty spots, derelict buildings too many times to remember, twice now upsetting packs of ferrel dogs as I had clearly taken their spot for the night. But sometimes you find the spot, nobody in sight, perfectly positioned trees for the hammock, a fresh water stream and good grass. There is something beautifully simple about a life where your main concerns are finding good grass and fresh water! Anyway, here we camped out the night, watching one after another shooting stars, completely unaware of how different tomorrow night would be ………

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Riding into a major town for the first time was something, I am now used to tourists snapping photographs without asking, something I have never been a fan of. But arriving in a fully westernised town on horseback is a complete new experience. Red though, calm as ever, taking it all in his stride, if only posing a little too much for the cameras. We had reached touching distance of Peru, entered the city only in order to purchase the permits to transport Red back to what will be a well deserved resting place. I had been told of a stable where we could rest the night, this turned out to be nothing more than an open field in the city centre, lined by broken bottles and a few too many questions. We pushed on, with light failing I snuck into an open lot, looked perfect, lots of grass and nobody in sight. Drifting off to sleep Red wakes me pulling my arm, looking up spot a man walking diagonally away from me towards a  corner of the lot, with no hesitation he goes to one bush, picks up a bag, then moves on. Confident he did not see us I stay for a little while, 20 minutes later another enters, goes into the bush and can clearly see his short, harsh blasts on a pipe. This one hangs around for a while, circles the bush, takes a few more blasts then spots me and Red, watching he seems unsure how to react he walks in my direction, confident in my position, even more so as unimpaired, I watch him come to within 15 metres before letting him know I was not sleeping, he runs in the other direction. After this I decided we would find another spot as wanted to get some sleep after a long day and so we moved, and things got a little more interesting.IMG_0990[1]

By now it is close to midnight, outskirts of a major city as we look for a spot, deciding it was going to be a sleepless one I snuck into another derelict building, not much cover with 2 large entrances we rested in shadows, hoping to go unnoticed and wait out the morning, not going to happen tonight! 3 guys pass, then again, the third time coming in. I had taken off Red’s saddle to allow him to rest so leaving was not an option, some questions, turned to raised voices, requests for money denied and they left once realised there was nothing to gain here. A few minutes later more figures at the entrance, by now am not in the best mood and told them would not be a good idea to enter then soon changed my tone as their faces came into the light. It was a family, a young girl, just 8 years old who had seen me enter my spot after getting a cup of coffee from a nearby cafe had gone home and at 12.30am dragged her family out to come and recuse me, offering Red and me a safe place for the night. I gladly accept the offer of this unbelievable friendly family. Looking at it like this – its 12.30am, a complete stranger is passing through a rough area of town on horseback, near 2 weeks without a shower and not exactly looking the most savoury of characters. This type of act of kindness is something that makes you sure there is more good in this world than we are led to believe. Pay too much attention to the media and live in fear, getting into the world and seeing it first hand will change your perception for the better.


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After a good nights rest and a rare cooked breakfast I went with the family as the children rode Red in the park, picking up feed for my friend before we headed off, invigorated by the experience of the previous night, but with a heavy heart headed off in search of transport.

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Part 2 to follow shortly. This one a little hard for me to write. I must say a huge thank you to everybody for the support through the recent appeal in raising funds to get Red to a beautiful farm in the North of Ecuador. Your kindness and generosity throughout this trip has been incredible. My focus now turns to the charities involved in this trip, hoping to link more volunteers, reach our fundraising goal and aid those who are making a real difference in this world.

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Thank you for reading, part 2 coming soon.

Marc

Volcanoes, open plains and rock wielding ladies

Heading on with real maps for the first time courtesy of a very generous friend we have been making good ground through incredible countryside, Ecuador truly is one of the most beautiful countries I have been lucky enough to visit, and the people so welcoming – except for the rock wielding old ladies ….. more to come on that.

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8 days ago we left Latacunga and the amazing hospitality of an incredible family. I got the chance to rest, this time was more for me than for Red as have been struggling with health issues the last 2 months, 8 months on the road and poor diet can take its toll on the body! I must say a huge thank you to all at El Picadero.

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Back in the saddle again and felt great, getting toward the end of the second day riding through a village of no more than 20 houses I hear somebody calling me “mister, mister” Normally would just ride on but stopped to see what the man wanted “are you the man riding to Peru?” he asks, little taken aback I spent some time talking to him, somehow word had got to this little village, I ended up spending the night with his family before heading on early. Over the last 8 nights have slept in the hammock, derelict buildings in run down areas on outskirts of towns, playgrounds, empty shacks 3700m up in the Andes and several fields, waking with Red led down sleeping next to me on more than one occasion, biting my beard, my hair and once with him stood on both of my feet – another 3 broken toes but if honest have never slept better.

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I am now riding the western side of the Andes, passing snow-capped volcanoes, thermal pools and nobody in sight. Feeling confident and with good maps I pushed further into the paramour. Riding though open plains I stop to soak it in, with a contentedness I have never before experienced, this journey is way more than I could have ever hoped for. Riding dirt tracks, no tracks and train tracks, everything but tarmac. Pulling up to a bakery in the mornings to the smell of fresh bread and getting served on the back of your horse is something else. Arriving in a small community I stopped to ask directions, I could not hear what the people were saying so rode a little closer, this seemed to upset them as the only Spanish-speaking member of the group shouted that I should leave now, that I need to be carefull as strangers are not welcome here, we argued for a little, pointing out that I purely wanted directions however when I noticed the crowd building and the little old ladies armed with rocks in their hands decided I would be ok without directions and galloped out of there. This would never change the way I feel about this beautiful country, in a way I can understand and respect them wanting to preserve their privacy. Just 24hrs before this I was invited into a stranger’s home, fed lunch and when I tried to leave was told would be rude to leave before dinner and should spend the night, should have skipped the dinner as was heart omelette but the sentiment was wonderful!

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I am now entering the final few weeks of the trip and with it facing the reality of parting ways with what has become my best friend. Am sure by now you would have figured out there is no way I could let Red go to anything but the perfect home and have been lucky enough to find that in the good people at El Picadero. We have been through a lot together, injuries, tough roads, amazing highs, formed a bond that I can draw no comparison to. He has saved my skin several times and like to think have given him the best possible care. So proud of what that skinny little horse from Medellin has turned into. And so I am appealing for a little help in getting him to his retirement home, it will take around $500 to transport him to a well deserved rest and also a place where he gets to continue what he is so good at, working with children. If you can support in any way through the buy a bale link I would be forever grateful, and anybody that is good enough to help us out gets riding rights ….. if you are ever in Ecuador! (which I would highly recommend!) I have been hoping for a long time I could find the right home for him whist I return to the UK and feel extremely fortunate to have found the perfect place,

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Now we head back into the Andes for the final push through Ecuador and onto the finish line, hard to believe we are now over 5000kms and 8 months into the journey with just a few weeks left.

Thank you for reading,

Marc

Freedom, well, that’s just some people talkin’

Exiting Cotopaxi National Park we continued South pressing through the stunning Avenida de los Volcanes high up in the Ecuadorian Andes. The nights here are cold, the mornings spent getting the blood moving into the toes again but the reward is incredible, watching the sun rise over the Eastern Cordillera, a soft red glow across the top of 4 snowcapped volcanoes. The riding here is unbelievable, open plains, nobody in sight as we follow the compass. I eventually needing more supplies, take a South West heading hoping to hit a town, passing eerily quiet deserted towns, looking like they got 80% complete and people either ran out of interest or money. Actuall tumbleweed crossing my path, the only sign to let me know the world has not ended is the drone of a highway 30kms to the west. IMG_0335IMG_0251

Eventually finding a small village I stock up again and head back into the mountains. Here you have no problem finding open spots to camp, anywhere that can offer a little protection from the wind works well, with nobody for miles around you can rest easy with a camp fire. This kind of freedom is what you hope for, the dream, setting up camp at the end of a day in the saddle. The thought now that I had before setting off of fishing, maybe reading a book are laughable. The truth of it is, making a fire, making sure your horse is comfortable and well fed and taking your boots off is the most you can be bothered to achieve. But the freedom, the chance to really adventure, challenge yourself and break away from the cottonwool wrapped, fearmongering is what it is all about, feeling alive. I truley appreciate this opportunity, knowing there are not many parts of the world where this kind of travel is possible or safe. The fact that freedom nowadays is viewed as a luxury.

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I was recently sent information about fellow long rider Geldy Kyarizov, held as a political prisoner in Turkmenistan, please if you have a moment follow the link and sign the petition. A reminder of the fact that free speech and “freedom” is not a luxury allowed throughout this world. Che Guevara once said “let the world change you and you can change the world” Appreciation of the things we have is so important, the ability to enjoy it, should not be a luxury.

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This last few days I have had a chance to taste local cuisine and get some valuable route knowledge for the road ahead. A mixture of emotions as we are prepairing for the big push to Peru, entering the final 1000kms the finish line is in sight. Wanting to make the most of what is left of this journey, the planned route will take us once again back into the wilderness, following the INCA trade route. Red looking strong, excited for what lay ahead.

Thank you for reading, for your support and messages. I have said it before but they really are appreciated!

Marc

Pumas, bureaucracy and assailants turned friends.

Riding the valley of volcanoes through Ecuador is something I have been hoping to see for many years but could not have in my wildest dreams expected what was to come.

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Red looking close to 100% we set off on foot from Pifo, wanting to know he was fully fit again before riding. Speaking to a retired army Colonel about my planned route he gave some words of advice -“the only thing to watch out for are the pumas, if you hear them on your right they are coming from the left, the bears are harmless” Colonel Moya had given me a contact who could help with route information. After 2 days I arrived at the home of “El Gato” a former military colleague of Colonel Moya. El Gato lives on the edge of the paramour, uncontactable by phone he was completely unaware who I was or why I was turning up at his doorstep yet welcomed me in like an old friend. I had walked into a big celebration, 4 generations of family there for fathers day, I was invited to join and once Red was in a field enjoyed dinner and listened to hunting stories from the elders. Again as with Colombia it is once you get away from the modernised culture that you really get to see the best of the people and of the country. After a very welcome feast, watching the peach schnapps and beer come out I decided this was the right time to get some rest, Gato kindly let me have a room in which to sleep, sleeping under the gaze of a mounted Puma head.

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The next morning after some vague at best directions from my sore headed host I headed on. Making my way through the maze of trails I eventually got frustrated as we were making little progress and decided it would look a lot better in the morning and finding an abandoned, half built house I set up camp for the night, things look a lot clearer after a good nights rest and a cup of English Breakfast – one of the few luxuries I allow myself!

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The following morning setting off at sunrise the path seemed to open up in front of me, I soon met Wilson Arroba, he was headed in the same direction and so we rode together into the valley, the scenery breathtaking. Arriving at Wilson’s home, circled by 6 volcanoes he invited me to a bowl of soup, watching me inhale it as though have not eaten for months he brings out another and a bread roll. With some real directions I headed on, this is where the scenery starts to really blow you away, riding a horse flanked either side by volcanoes, the kind of place you go to take a photo but don’t know where to point the camera. Two days later arriving at the paramour Red getting stronger by the day we cantered for the first time across open plains.

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Camping at the foothills of Volcan Cotopaxi, enjoying the chance to have a fire to cook and keep warm at night. Around midnight a truck pulls up, 5 men jump out and come straight towards me, two of them asking questions as the others circled my camp, by now am used to unexpected visitors in the night but five is a little different, some words back and forward I smelt the alcohol on them and felt a little more confident, telling them politely it would be best if they left. Once they knew there was nothing they were getting from me the atmosphere changed, after some apologies and hand shakes we re-lit the fire and they produced fresh trout they had caught in the nearby river, telling me they are allowed to fish here because they are the people of the paramour I did not argue and enjoyed a feed with them before they headed on into the night, they tell me to keep the fire going as it will keep the animals away, with them out of sight I let it die down, preferring the threat of animals to that of humans.

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The following morning we entered the stunning Cotopaxi National Park, by the afternoon on the southern side of the volcanoe I was stopped by four park rangers, demanding to see my documents and asking what I was doing. It would appear that pets are not allowed in the National Parks, and Red was classed as a pet, this thought had never entered my head, travel companion yes, but never think of him as a pet. The conversation got heated as they threatened to take Red, and imposed fines on me. Losing my cool I stopped my rant when I heard myself shouting about how in 1822 a man called Simon Bolivar rode a horse through here and liberated Ecuador. Eventually the situation was resolved but I was forced to leave the park, fined and disillusioned.

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And so here we are, in a country so beautiful that it has over 40 national parks covering nearly 20% of the country. I have today learnt that I can have special permission to pass these areas without fear of my horse being taken from me, of course this comes at a cost. After the reserves were hit with recent injuries and fines we really appreciate the support through “buy a bale” apart from the reality that it means food for us both it could give the pass needed to continue riding, we did not come here to walk the pan american highway! After being knocked down twice already on this trip by trucks as I walked Red down highways could really do with some help avoiding that again, people ask what is the scariest thing, most dangerous encounter, without a doubt it is the truck driver! A big thank you for all the support as everything really makes a huge difference to us, and for the messages that keep us motivated in places where the first 10 minutes of the day are spent rubbing your feet to get feeling back, thank you!

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Thank you for reading,

Marc

What good story ends with “and then I gave up and took the easy route”

10 days ago I set off from Palermo knowing I was limited in time to make it to the border by the 17th. 3 days ago after filling a plastic bag with other people’s leftovers from a restuarant table I nearly broke. Tired, hungry, boots full of blisters and the body feeling the last 5 months of travel. I have to be honest and admit there have been times over the last weeks I have though of giving up. Exhausted I have considered looking for a farm to guard Red and finish the journey some other way. Then after finding a cural in which to spend the night realised. What good story ends with “and then I gave up and took the easy route” I knew this was not going to be easy, nothing worth achieving is

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We have been pushing hard to make the border ever since Pereira 2 months ago. Resting 1 day in 6, sometimes covering up to 42kms on foot in a day. Making sure my horse gets enough feed and carrying on by foot in order to allow us to cover more ground, has gotten pretty tough going the last few weeks. But lying there in the hammock and Red coming over to butt heads I knew there is no way I can give up. We have come too far. IMG_8925 Spending the last 10 nights anywhere we can, from cattle weighing stations to curals, nights in the hammock or on the floor, any space out of sight. Have been told many times this area is “calliente” Guerilla territory, heard this many times before in areas I passed with no problems but here I can believe it. The people wary at times, getting permission to rest in a field at night is hard to come by and so we wait until dark to sneak in and leave before sunrise. Saying this though I have passed some stunning scenery, mountain passes, riding lone for days without even seeing another person, has been an incredible if testing section of the journey. Even was joined by a slightly unhinged man who decided to walk 12hrs with me, to be honest was glad of the company, made a change, even if I did have to hear countless times how walking hurts his colon.

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So here we are, 5 months and 14 days into the ride through Colombia, 1485kms covered and 400kms out from the border with only 7 days to make Ecuador. With severe penalties for overstaying your visa (even more so when granted an extension once) I am unfortunately forced to consider the expensive option of transporting to the border. Goes against everything but I have not much choice if I wish to finish the journey with Red. And so now more than ever your support is appreciated as I consider having to use the “buy a bale” donations and pay to get Red across the border and keep the journey alive. IMG_9048 Quitting is not an option, the bond I have with my horse is incredible, the difference in the the last 5 months unbelievable. The messages and support really do keep us moving, motivated, the target of the next volunteer destination is in sight. And so there is only one thing for it. As a wise man once told me – “get out there and fill your boots” I hope to be writting to you again after the 17th. From Ecuador

Thank you for reading.

Marc

On track

10 days ago I set off on the railway track, taking the most direct and untrodden path to Cali, had no idea just how crazy this railway section would be.

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I spent the Christmas period with a wonderfull family in the small village of La Felisa, working driving cattle and milking in return for a space for my hammock, use of the first shower I had seen in a while and field for Red to rest and graze in.

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After 3 nights of the first real sleep in a while I was ready to hit the trail. This is where the journey really begins for me, off the beaten track and testing myself and my horse. The first days ride went pretty smoothly, stunning scenery and passing a few houses and abandoned railway stations, by day 2 the track became more and more overgrown to where I was having to cut through some sections as the jungle had taken over. Riding through thick mud with my horse sinking to halfway up his legs, deep river crossings where bridges were too unsafe to pass and one very sketchy bridge crossing. Red did not like the look of one and so had to blindfold him to guide him over. The middle was rotten wood with huge gaps in it, and the other side of the 1ft wide strip i could walk on was staight down to the Rio Cauca, was a tense walk across knowing that one wrong foot and we were in the drink. Red did well as our trust in each other grows and after the longest 30 seconds of the trip we were on the other side.

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From what I can gather the railroad has been out of use for somewhere around 10 years, and in a part of the world where grass grows to over half a metre in less than a month you can imagine what it would look like after a few years. The tracks are mostly vissable but some parts get pretty rough, is Imagen 006exactly what was looking for and one of the bonuses is that am making great progress without having to zig zag my way south trying to avoid main roads.

I am currently in another small village halfway from my start point to volunteer location, the idea was to rest after some hard riding and continue after 2 nights but things took a turn for the worse. A snake spooked Red in his stable and he kicked his way through the stable door cutting up his leg pretty badly, luckily I was close to hand and was able to stop the bleeding whilst waiting for the vet to arrive. After a nervous examination we only had skin lacerations and a lot of swelling to deal with, never felt so relieved, after a 2 page vet’s bill, series of injections, twice a day treatment of the wounds and plenty of feeding he is on the road to recovery, vet says anything from 5-10 days and we should be able to continue. Am just happy that he is ok.

I am the only tourist in this small town and first from England to stay at this bizzarre hostel type place where I have to explain who I am every time I want to return to the room as the 93 year owner is a little forgetful. New Years Eve here is a 3 day party and still going, lots of salsa, loud, loud firecrackers, aguadiente (the local spirit) and some of the most welcoming and friendly people I have encountered on the trip. I am currently working mornings in return for breakfast and a space for Red to recover delivering gas to the surrounding villages with my new friend Luis, also been spending time with his family after being invited to celebrate New Years with them. Is something that I love about here, family means so much, they really take care of one another, and welcome strangers with open arms. Don’t know how many times here I have been asked if I speak to home and what my mother thinks of me doing this alone. Really is nice to be in a culture where the important things matter.

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Cleaned up and healing slowly

So for now is a wait until Red is ready and then back on the trail, we are 4 days in to the recovery period and getting stronger every day, also making the most of the rich pasture and the horse is putting on weight and attracting more fans every day. Once we are ready to continue it is back to the railway track, cannot wait. Thank you all again for the support and messages. Happy New Year all.

The railroad South

Since my last blog I have spent 3 nights in stables, 4 hiding in fields I should not have been in, slept in 1 house, 1 mouse filled barn and a corridor.

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Travelling over 120kms, around 50 of that on foot, climbing countless mountains, through rivers and dirt tracks, milked my first cow and worked some of the wildest farm machinery I have ever seen in return for 2 hot meals and a place to hang my hammock for the night –  in the process getting electrocuted enough times to power a small village.IMG_6101 IMG_6094IMG_6068

I have been riding in search of a disused railway and yesterday finally found it after hearing over and over that it no longer existed. This will lead me South away from all roads and traffic and to my volunteer location. The rail track follows the Rio Cauca through the Colombian countryside, this stretch is mostly uninhabited making it easier to find a spot to hang the hammock for the night.

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The road here has been incredible, 1 day above the clouds, the next seeing the whole ecosystem change, dropping into tropical valleys, wild bamboo forests shooting 50m into the sky, plants with leaves as big as your torso and electric blue butterflies, each wing as big as your hand. It really is a beautiful country and feel lucky to be able to experience it in this way.

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I have been fortunate enough in that complete strangers have invited me into their home, feeding me, in some cases giving me a place to sleep, giving advice on planned routes and a lot of confusion as to why I would want to travel all that way. Have to say some of the most hospitable people I have ever met.

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A the trip continues, Red my horse improves every day getting stronger and more confident as I put into practice what I learnt in preparation for this trip at the incredible Rancho Chilamate – A big thank you to all the team there, could not have got this far without your help. As the trust between myself and my horse gets stronger, so the ride gets more enjoyable. We have been lucky enough to find a spot to rest up for a few days before hitting the track South – much needed for both of us and a chance to wish all at home a merry Christmas and enjoy my first Colombian Christmas experience, also to eat off of a plate!

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I will be heading South on the 26th December and looking forward to whatever is in store. Until the next blog Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Thank you for reading.

And many thanks for the continued support for the charities involved and for the recent “buy a bale” donation – Red treated to 3kgs of concentrado and a bag of molasses for Christmas!